It’s Sunday Morning & I Really Don’t Care …

Fred McKinnon —  February 7, 2013 — 12 Comments

Today’s blog post is for those of us who are a part of leading some element of our corporate worship services. Perhaps you’re the worship leader or a musician. Maybe you’re an up-front vocalist that everyone sees. Perhaps you’re the teaching pastor or a small group leader for the youth.

Today’s post is for all of us who, despite our prayers and devotion to God, wake up on Sunday morning with a heavy, apathetic attitude that simply screams,

“It’s Sunday morning and I really don’t care!”

I alluded to this in my weekly service recap earlier this week. I found myself fighting this apathy and lack of passion this past Sunday morning. It’s quite easy for me to confess that yet at the same time, I know what judgmental thoughts start ringing in the minds of those who hear it.

you need to be more prayed up
confess your sins, something is wrong
you should’ve gone to bed earlier
this is a sign your heart has grown cold and your fire dim to the Lord …

and my personal favorite rock to throw … “you wouldn’t be this way if you were going ______________________”
[insert your favorite past time, ie. going to a Georgia game, going offshore fishing, etc]

Regardless of the reason or cause, most of us have experienced days like this.

What do you do? How do you proceed? When all the prayers don’t seem to work? When the team surrounds you and calls down fire from heaven and rebukes all the heavy spirits and all that other “stuff” … yet, you feel the same?

Here’s what you do:

You worship anyway.
You praise and sing the words even if they seem meaningless.
You pray and ask God to lift you up from that place and BELIEVE that He hears you.
AGGRESSIVELY dismiss the lies of condemnation that say it’s your fault .. had you only “been better”.

You see, in my opinion, leading when you don’t feel like it isn’t inauthentic. It’s incredibly authentic. It’s only inauthentic when you pretend that you’re heart is on fire for God when in fact, you’re struggling.

Sometimes … most times … the feeling will lift and you’ll feel it. You’ll know it. Whatever the reason, the spirit of heaviness leaves.
Other times, it may not. It may last a day … a week … or longer. This means it’s time to reach out for some counsel and accountability.

Has this happened to you? How did you handle it? Did you confess it openly or conceal it? Did it lift?
I’d love to hear your stories. Post in the comments below.

For the Kingdom,
Fred

Fred McKinnon

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Fred McKinnon, Worship Artist, Pianist, Producer. Husband to Joy, Father of Jon Michael, Will, Rebekah, and Andrew. Lives on St. Simons Island, GA.

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  • http://www.theworshipcommunity.com Russ Hutto

    Great post Fred! Thanks for the encouragement!

    • http://www.fredmckinnon.com fmckinnon

      Thanks Russ!

  • http://thebeardedidealist.com/ Stephen Haggerty

    Great stuff, Fred. I appreciate you being transparent enough to bring up a feeling we’ve all had. I think that is solid advice- seems like the best response is to worship anyway, and to ask God to bring meaning and passion into it.

    • http://www.fredmckinnon.com fmckinnon

      Thanks Stephen I sort of figured I wasn’t alone

  • WendyTK

    I really love how honest this post is. I think that many people just figure that pastors and Worship leaders are jus naturally on fire every Sunday morning–almost as if we are doing a job and have to arrive with a certain attitude or mindset. But what is even better is to show up to serve as the broken, confused, hurting sinners that we are. Especially when that is truly how we are feeling. Very cool, thanks for sharing.

    • http://www.fredmckinnon.com fmckinnon

      Wendy
      Thanks so much for the comment. I believe this is resonating with people in a real way

  • Ryan Baldwin

    Happened? More like happening.
    To take your post one step further, I’ve discovered that there’s a fine line between worshipping with my will (since my heart can’t get there today) and worshipping against my will. I didn’t quite reach the latter state but I was close enough to see it way too clearly. I had wondered where the line was for when I really shouldn’t be leading. That’s where it was.
    When you’re going through the ‘valley’, sometimes it is simply out of obedience and with your will that you worship. You bring your spirit along as best you know how and it’s still in truth. I believe God still receives that. But the moment you’re stepping over that line into leading worship against your will (because of whatever is going on in your heart and life), then I think you’re stepping into some dangerous territory. Best to step back from the front role and start asking God and yourself the tough questions about how you got to the state you’re in and seeking Him for how you’re going to get out.

    • http://www.fredmckinnon.com fmckinnon

      Ryan,
      This resonates, eh!? Thanks so much for sharing your thoughts. You are spot on. And I believe you’re right, there is a time when we may need to step down from leading .. .figuring that out is the hard part sometimes, and helps to have someone we are accountable to. Thankfully, this week (for me) was amazing and I didn’t feel like that at all!

  • Pingback: Fighting Apathy | Worship Links

  • http://www.robstill.com Rob Still

    Thanks for your honesty Fred, it gives us permission to be real. The “truth” part of “spirit and truth” is important, isn’t it? Have a blessed weekend!

    • http://www.fredmckinnon.com Fred McKinnon

      Rob,
      Thanks for commenting friend. It’s time we all get real.

    • http://www.fredmckinnon.com fmckinnon

      Thanks, Rob — it’s about time all of us get real and authentic, right!?